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Content Curation

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With the Infoloom Topic Curation Editorial Interface, you gain control over the way your topics are set. 

If the topics acquired by automatic ingestion do not correspond exactly to what you need, there are several things you can do to fix it:

One Topic, Multiple names

You may end up with topics having different names, but that you want to consider as one and only topics (for example, "New York City" and "New York").

Split a topic

On the contrary, you may have extracted several topics under one name, which you want to separate as different topics (for example, "New York" as the city and "New York" as the state).


Same name, different topics

You may want to use the same name for different topics. For example, "New York" is a legitimate topic name for the city and also for the state.

Names for search only

You may want to use certain names for search purpose only, but not consider them as topic names that you display in your lists. For example, "Big Apple" may be used to find "New York", but you don't want to consider it among your official name for New York.

Translate topic names

You may want to use different names in different languages. For Spanish speakers, "New York" is known as "Nueva York".

Preferred Name

Among multiple names for a topic, you may want to privilege one of the names to be used when referring to this topic. 

Relate topics

You may want to create specific relations between topics that only apply. For example, "Manhattan" "is a borough of" "New York" (as city). The semantic of these relations is left for the users to define.


Assign categories to topics

You may want to categorize your topics by category, so that you can easily retrieve all the topics under a certain category. 


Create Taxonomies

You can create a taxonomy by assigning a category to a topic. Then you can use these categories to facilitate the retrieval of topics, by providing specialized lists.

Create Ontologies

Topics can be related by semantic relationships that are defined by the user. Relationships used in ontologies, such as "narrower term", "broader term", "related term" can be used, as well as customized relationships ("married with", "located in", "written by", etc.).

Attach topics to sources

You may want to refine the indexing of your content as a way to complement the result of the ingestion process, by editing the way topics are attached to the sources.

Expand Topics

For each topic, you can manually add links to relevant web sites. These links can be organized under headers.